Book review: Poucette de Andersen et illustré par Elisabeth Nyman

Book Reviews

(In English over here!)

Je voulais partager ce livre avec vous car il s’agit d’une autre trouvaille que j’ai faite dans les livres à vendre de ma bibliothèque. Je l’ai adopté parce qu’enfant j’adorais le film de Poucette (1994): un prince fée, des grenouilles qui chantent, des costumes exubérants et des chansons loufoques. Il y avait vraiment tout pour me plaire. Et donc, lorsque j’ai vu ce livre de Poucette, je me suis dis qu’il était temps que je lise la version originale de ce conte de H.C. Andersen.

Cette version beaucoup plus sobre du conte est illustré par Elisabeth Nyman. Après avoir passer quelques moments à chercher sur internet, je dois dire que cette illustratrice est bien mystérieuse! Peut-être suédoise, peut-être allemande, elle semble avoir illustré au moins un autre conte de Andersen, mais c’est là toutes les informations que j’ai réussi à récolter à son sujet. C’est bien dommage, car cette peintre a créé un univers tout en douceur et en atmosphère pour ce livre par ces peintures remplies de poésie.

J’ai particulièrement apprécié les couleurs chaudes qui trouvent une place dans chacune des illustrations. Le traitement de la lumière est également très réussi. À première vue, on pourrait croire que les peintures sont peu détaillées par leur effet “impressionniste”. Cependant, la majorité des plantes sont identifiables, les animaux sont habilement représentés, et les scènes d’intérieurs regorge de petits objets de la vie quotidienne. J’ai beaucoup aimé justement qu’une peintre plus classique s’attaque à un livre pour enfant. Il me semble que cela propose quelque chose d’un peu différent, mais de très riche, aux jeunes lecteurs.

Par contre, je dois avouer que la lecture de ce conte m’a un peu surprise. Pauvre Poucette! Elle semble victime de tous les évènements et sa seule perspective d’avenir est de devenir l’épouse d’un crapaud, d’un hanneton ou d’une taupe! L’histoire semble s’arrêter abruptement au moment où Poucette prend finalement la décision de s’enfuit avec son amie l’hirondelle. Elle rencontre rapidement un prince fée et l’épouse, ce qui met fin au conte. Je dois dire que je suis restée un peu sur ma faim! J’aurais aimé une Poucette un peu plus volontaire, aventurière et contestataire. Mais, comme il s’agit de l’histoire d’origine, publiée pour la première fois en 1835, on peut comprendre son contexte historique et social.

Malgré cela, ce fut un plaisir de découvrir cette version du conte et cette illustratrice bien intrigante. J’ai beaucoup aimé son style de peinture qui emporte le lecteur dans une atmosphère un peu mystérieuse qui se marie très bien à l’histoire. Je n’ai malheureusement pas pu trouver beaucoup d’information sur ce livre, mais qui sait, vous tomberez peut-être dessus lors de votre prochaine visite à votre bibliothèque!

Poucette, par Andersen et illustré par Elisabeth Nyman, 1991, Milan


 

Book review: Thumbelina by Andersen and illustrated by Elisabeth Nyman

I wanted to share this book with you because it is yet another find I made in the books for sale at my library. I picked it up because as a child I loved the Thumbelina movie (1994): a fairy prince, singing frogs, exuberant costumes and goofy songs. It really had it all. And so, when I saw this Thumbelina book, I thought it was time to read the original version of this H.C. Andersen tale.

This much more sober version of the tale is illustrated by Elisabeth Nyman. After spending some time searching on the internet, I must say that this illustrator is quite mysterious! Maybe Swedish, maybe German, she seems to have illustrated at least one other Andersen tale, but that’s all the information I managed to gather about her. It’s a pity, because this painter has created a very soft and atmospheric world for this book with her paintings full of poetry.

I particularly liked the warm colors that find a place in each of the illustrations. The treatment of light is also very successful. At first glance, one has the impression that the paintings are not very detailed because of their ” impressionist ” effect. However, the majority of the plants are identifiable, the animals are cleverly represented, and the interior scenes are full of small objects of everyday life. I really liked that a more classical painter tackled a children’s book. It seems to me that it offers something a little different, but very rich, to young readers.

On the other hand, I must admit that reading this tale now surprised me a bit. Poor Thumbelina! She seems to be a victim of all events and her only future prospect is to become the wife of a toad, a cockchafer or a mole! The story seems to end abruptly when Thumbelina finally decides to run away with her friend the swallow. She soon meets a fairy prince and marries him, which ends the tale. I have to say that I was a little disappointed! I would have liked a Thumbelina who was a little more willing, adventurous and outspoken. But, since this is the original story, first published in 1835, one can understand its historical and social context.

Despite this, it was a pleasure to discover this version of the tale and this very intriguing illustrator. I really liked her style of painting that takes the reader into a mysterious atmosphere that goes very well with the story. Unfortunately, I couldn’t find much information about this book, but who knows, maybe you’ll stumble upon it during your next visit to your library!

Thumbelina, by Andersen and illustratd by Elisabeth Nyman, 1991, Milan

Weekly News 12-02-2020

weekly news

(This is a news letter I sent out. If you’d like to receive fresh news every week, sign up here! The full newsletter contains surprises and is delivered once a week to your mailbox.)

Atelier News

I hope you are all doing well!

Well, what can I say. When I’m not painting pine cones, I’m painting mushrooms, and when I’m not painting mushrooms, I’m painting pine cones. This week is a mushroom week! 

I’m learning a lot with these little subjects and mushrooms are really incredibly fascinating, so I’m having a lot of fun while I’m learning.

Incidentally, I wanted to try painting from a real mushroom instead of always using pictures. At my favorite organic grocery store, I selected the most beautiful shiitake I bought (under the amused eye of the cashier who must not sell a lot of mushrooms in packs of one…), brought it home and carefully put it in the fridge waiting for my next painting session… I must have waited too long because my beautiful mushroom was all shrivelled after 2 days in the fridge! I still tried to paint it, but I will have to repeat the experience with a real fresh mushroom!

Inspiration

This week, I present my favourite fairy tale book : An Illustrated Treasury of Swedish Folk and Fairy Tales, by John Bauer

Head over to the blog for a full review!

Youtube

Happy December! I’m inviting you to visit my November!

Small treat

They sound like pirates and love potatoes: these are my people!

(If you enjoyed reading this, consider signing up to my newsletter. Each week, I send fresh news and surprise! Sign up here!)

Book review: The Magic Fish by Trung Le Nguyen

Book Reviews

(En Français par ici!)

This book found its way to me at the perfect time! With all the Asian targeted racism stories going around in the news, I’ve been worried for my mom, cousins and friends, while feeling unsettled because I pass for white. Navigating all of this peacefully is quite difficult, but reading this book made me feel seen, and it felt great to connect with another Vietnamese artist through his work. This week, I’m sharing The Magic Fish by Trung Le Nguyen, aka Trungles.

What strikes me the most about this book is how clear the drawings are. The line work is precise and detailed, and everything is clear and immediately understood. I find this very impressive! The artwork support the story and never gets in the way of the narrative. Because of this, it is so easy and pleasant to get absorbed in the book and focus on the characters and their experiences. I also really enjoyed how each branch of the story has a particular colour. This gave the book a cinematic feel as it bounces between fairy tales, memories and present day life. It also made everything very clear, and again, easy to understand and follow. I was also very impressed by how monochromatic pages ended up being so interesting and more sophisticated in a way.

Once you get over how amazing the art is, the story itself is very touching. We follow Tiến, a young teenager who struggles with coming out to his parents. The author adds a layer of complexity to this already difficult situation by highlighting the language barrier between Tiến and his parents. This book also addresses immigration in a very tender and raw manner. Many of the elements surrounding the life of Vietnamese immigrants reminded me of my mom’s and my own story. It is fascinating to relate to a book in this way. It’s also very interesting to focus the story to the “after”. Most stories I’ve read about Vietnamese immigration focus on the journey of Boat People, the war that lead to their exodus, or their lives in refugee camps, whereas this book is set many years after the family is settled in the United States. This brings themes of identity, culture and belonging even more complex and rich.

Finally, if you are a graphic novel nerd, I’m sure you’ll be impressed by the layout of this book and how the author seamlessly goes from one story line to the other. I particularly enjoyed how fairy tales intersect with the main story and how Asian versions of classic fairy tales like the Little Mermaid or Cinderella are depicted. Being an avid reader of fairy tales, this was refreshing and made me want to learn more about Vietnamese and other Asian folklore.

Overall, you need to read this book! The story is touching and so relevant in our current context. I enjoyed every page of this graphic novel, and the characters stay with you even when you’re done reading. Humour, folklore, family, love, resilience and hurt; this book will take you on a roller-coaster of emotions. I’m in complete awe both with the writing and illustrations, and I’m sure you will be to!

The Magic Fish, by Trung Le Nguyen aka Trungles, RH Graphic

Not yet translated!


 

Book review: The Magic Fish par Trung Le Nguyen

Ce livre a trouvé son chemin vers moi au moment idéal ! Avec toutes les histoires de racisme ciblant les Asiatiques qui circulent dans les médias, je suis inquiète pour ma mère, mes cousins et mes amis, tout en me sentant déstabilisée parce que je passe pour blanche. Naviguer dans tout cela de manière pacifique est assez difficile, mais la lecture de ce livre m’a donné le sentiment d’être vue, et j’ai été ravie d’entrer en contact avec un autre artiste vietnamien à travers son œuvre. Cette semaine, je vous présente The Magic Fish de Trung Le Nguyen, alias Trungles.

Ce qui me frappe le plus dans ce livre, c’est la clarté des dessins. Le travail du trait est précis et détaillé, et tout est clair et immédiatement compréhensible. Je trouve cela très impressionnant ! Les illustrations soutiennent l’histoire et ne gênent jamais la narration. C’est pourquoi il est si facile et agréable de se laisser absorber par le livre et de se concentrer sur les personnages et leurs expériences. J’ai aussi beaucoup apprécié la façon dont chaque branche de l’histoire a une couleur particulière. Cela donne une impression de cinéma au livre, qui oscille entre les contes de fées, les souvenirs et la vie présente. Cela a également rendu le tout très clair, et encore une fois, facile à comprendre et à suivre. J’ai également été très impressionnée par la façon dont les pages monochromes sont finalement si intéressantes et plus sophistiquées d’une certaine façon.

Une fois que l’on se concentre sur autre chose que l’art, l’histoire elle-même est très touchante. Nous suivons Tiến, un jeune adolescent qui a du mal à faire son coming out auprès de ses parents. L’auteur ajoute une couche de complexité à cette situation déjà difficile en soulignant la barrière de la langue entre Tiến et ses parents. Ce livre aborde également la question de l’immigration d’une manière très tendre. De nombreux éléments entourant la vie des immigrants vietnamiens m’ont rappelé l’histoire de ma mère et la mienne. Il est fascinant de s’identifier à un livre de cette manière. Il est également très intéressant de centrer l’histoire sur “l’après”. La plupart des histoires que j’ai lues sur l’immigration vietnamienne se concentrent sur le voyage des Boat People, la guerre qui a conduit à leur exode ou leur vie dans les camps de réfugiés, alors que ce livre se déroule plusieurs années après l’installation de la famille aux États-Unis. Cela rend les thèmes de l’identité, de la culture et de l’appartenance encore plus complexes et riches.

Enfin, si vous êtes un fan de bandes dessinées, je suis certaine que vous serez impressionné par la mise en page de ce livre et la façon dont l’auteur passe d’une histoire à l’autre. J’ai particulièrement apprécié la façon dont les contes de fées s’entrecroisent avec l’histoire principale et comment les versions asiatiques des contes de fées classiques comme la Petite Sirène ou Cendrillon sont représentées. Étant une lectrice assidue de contes de fées, cette histoire était rafraîchissante et m’a donné envie d’en apprendre davantage sur le folklore vietnamien et asiatique.

En résumé, vous devez lire ce livre ! L’histoire est touchante et tellement pertinente dans notre contexte actuel. J’ai apprécié chaque page de ce roman graphique, et les personnages restent avec vous même lorsque vous avez fini de lire. L’humour, le folklore, la famille, l’amour, la résilience et la douleur ; ce livre vous emmènera dans une montagne russe d’émotions. Je suis en admiration devant l’écriture et les illustrations, et je suis sûre que vous le serez aussi !

The Magic Fish, par Trung Le Nguyen aka Trungles, RH Graphic

Ce livre est sorti l’automne dernier et n’est pas encore disponible en français.

Weekly News 11-25-2020

weekly news

(This is a news letter I sent out. If you’d like to receive fresh news every week, sign up here! The full newsletter contains surprises and is delivered once a week to your mailbox.)

Atelier News

I hope you are all doing well!

As I’m writing this, a soft snow is falling outside and everything is beautiful. It is soothing to focus on those tiny magical things.

We’ve had to deal with a lot of stress and disappointment last week, but this week is looking up. It’s looking up because we’ve taken small actions and tried our best to be patient and indulgent with ourselves. It’s not always easy, but it is always worthwhile.

In the Atelier, I’ve been practising painting pine cones again, and there is something very peaceful and healing in repeating the same forms again and again, in mixing the same colours again and again. I’m finding comfort in repetition and in creating beautiful little pine cones. 

New at the boutique

Because I’ve got pine cones on my mind, here are a few pine cone items to bring a bit of forest magic to your every day life and holiday season!


THERE ARE A FEW COPIES OF MY BOOK LEFT IN STORE!

Inspiration

We’re diving head first into the wonderful world of fairies this week with this beautiful book: La Grande Bible des Fées by Edouard Brasey.

Head over to the blog for a full review!

Small treat

A little strange vacation…

(If you enjoyed reading this, consider signing up to my newsletter. Each week, I send fresh news and surprise! Sign up here!)

Book review: L’escapade de Paolo par Lucie Papineau et Lucie Crovatto

Book Reviews

(In English over here!)

Cette semaine, je vous partage un autre livre par une écrivaine et une illustratrice Canadienne: L’escapade de Paolo écrit par Lucie Papineau et illustré par Lucie Crovatto. Ce livre tout en douceur est vraiment charmant et met en scène le petit Paolo et son amie Camille.

Encore une fois, et presque comme toujours, ce sont bien les illustrations qui m’ont attirée vers ce livre. Les images qui semblent être faites aux crayons de couleur donne un effet naïf et appaisant. Le choix des couleurs participe également à créer un univers serein et tendre. À chaque fois que je regarde ce livre, j’ai l’impression d’être dans le jardin de Paolo, entourée de fleurs, enveloppée dans une douce lumière de début d’été. Les textures utilisées ajoutent également à cet effet d’enveloppement.

J’ai également été charmée par tous les oiseaux qui sont présents dans le livre. Au travers des pages, on reconnait de nombreux oiseaux d’Amérique du Nord, et on en recontre de nouveaux. Les illustrations précises permettent d’apprendre à identifier ces oiseaux qui virevoltent dans le jardin de Paolo et de Camille. De plus, ceux-ci sont aussi cachés un peu partout dans le livre, et on se surprend à s’amuser à nommer le plus d’oiseaux possible de page en page.

Avant de passer à l’histoire, je dois mentionner la petite Camille qui est simplement adorable! Le détail mis dans la création de ce personnage la rende bien vivante. J’ai beaucoup aimé ses vêtements tout en couleurs et en motifs! Durant l’histoire, on suit le petit Paolo qui observe les oiseaux du jardin jusqu’à les rejoindre un jour. Bien que l’histoire soit assez simple, elle aborde les thèmes de la liberté, de l’appartenance ainsi que de l’amitié. Il est rafraichissant d’avoir une histoire d’amitié entre une petite fille et un oiseau. Et la personnalité du petit Paolo fait qu’on s’attache à lui très facilement.

Pour finir, ce livre est adorable et vraiment très joli. Les illustrations créent un univers enchanteur et l’histoire d’amitié plaira aux jeunes lecteurs à qui s’adresse ce livre. Le lecteur plus avancé sera sans nul doute amusé d’apprendre à reconnaître certains oiseaux et à explorer la nature avoisinante pour les y voir. Finalement, petit détail vraiment sympathique: La couverture “jaquette” se déplie en affiche présentant les différents oiseaux du livre! Bref, ce livre est parfait pour les jeunes ornithologues!

L’escapade de Paolo, par Lucie Papineau et Lucie Crovatto, Éditions La Bagnole

Pas encore disponible en Anglais malheureusement!


 

Book review: Paolo’s Adventure by Lucie Papineau and Lucie Crovatto

This week, I share with you another book by a Canadian writer and illustrator: L’escapade de Paolo written by Lucie Papineau and illustrated by Lucie Crovatto. This sweet book is really charming and features little Paolo and his friend Camille.

Once again, and almost as always, it was the illustrations that drew me to this book. The images that seem to be made with colored pencils give a naive and soothing effect. The choice of colors also contributes to create a serene and tender universe. Every time I look at this book, I feel like I am in Paolo’s garden, surrounded by flowers, wrapped in a soft early summer light. The textures used also add to this enveloping effect.

I was also charmed by all the birds that are present in the book. Through the pages, we recognize many North American birds, and we meet new ones. The precise illustrations allow us to learn how to identify the birds that fly around Paolo and Camille’s garden. Moreover, these birds are also hidden throughout the book, and we find ourselves having fun naming as many birds as possible from page to page.

Before I get to the story, I have to mention little Camille who is simply adorable! The details put into the creation of this character make her come alive. I really liked her colorful and patterned clothes! During the story, we follow little Paolo who observes the birds in the garden until he joins them one day. Although the story is fairly simple, it touches on themes of freedom, belonging, and friendship. It is refreshing to have a story of friendship between a little girl and a bird. And the personality of little Paolo makes it easy to get attached to him.

Finally, this book is adorable and really pretty. The illustrations create an enchanting world and the story of friendship will appeal to the young readers for whom this book is intended. The more advanced reader will undoubtedly be amused to learn how to recognize some of the birds and to explore the surrounding nature to see them. Finally, a really nice detail: The cover “dust jacket” unfolds into a poster presenting the different birds of the book! In short, this book is perfect for young birders!

L’escapade de Paolo, par Lucie Papineau et Lucie Crovatto, Éditions La Bagnole

Not yet available in English, unfortunately!

Weekly News 11-18-2020

weekly news

(This is a news letter I sent out. If you’d like to receive fresh news every week, sign up here! The full newsletter contains surprises and is delivered once a week to your mailbox.)

Atelier News

I hope you are all doing well!

This week, I’m a bit of a mess, and I’ve been dealing with a lot of anxiety and frustration. So, please bear with me while I swim through these troubled waters. Nothing major, just a growing feeling of alienation from a world that I don’t recognize or understand. But hey, I’m hanging on to my desk, and it should pass!

I had a lot of Christmas orders to prep and send out, and that has kept me busy. I love packing orders and imagining the lives my products will have in their new homes. It’s always so gratifying to send out my own creations into the world!

New at the boutique

Last call for Xmas cards!


THERE ARE A FEW COPIES OF MY BOOK LEFT IN STORE!

Inspiration

This week, plant lovers will be happy with this book review. Discover Botanicum!

Head over to the blog for a full review!

Small treat

Kittens. That’s all 🙂

(If you enjoyed reading this, consider signing up to my newsletter. Each week, I send fresh news and surprise! Sign up here!)

Book review: Entre Ciel et Mer par Les Frères Fan

Book Reviews

(In English over here!)

Cette semaine, je vous partage un autre livre par des écrivains et illustrateurs canadiens: Entre ciel et mer par les Frères Fan. Il y a quelque temps maintenant, j’avais repéré ce livre dans une petite librairie. Je m’étais dit, «ce livre est vraiment beau… s’il est encore là la prochaine fois, je le prend! » Pas de gros suspense, je suis retournée exprès pour le chercher… et je ne suis pas déçue!

Ce livre suit Félix qui part en voyage imaginaire en bateau à la recherche de cet endroit entre le ciel et la mer dont lui avait parlé son grand-père. Faisant subtilement écho aux contes chinois, cette histoire est douce et pleine d’imagination. Le texte étant assez minimal, on est rapidement absorbé dans les magnifiques illustrations remplie de détails fantastiques et amusants.

Cet album est très doux. L’histoire est simple, mais permet d’aborder des thèmes importants comme le deuil, le souvenir ainsi que l’héritage avec les enfants. Encore une fois, les illustrations de ce livres attirent l’œil par leur richesse. Comme d’autres livres que j’ai déjà partagés, les illustrations ont été faites au graphite et coloriées à l’ordinateur. Cette technique crée ici une impression de feutrage, qui correspond très bien au voyage de Félix. Les images sont également composées de façon très habiles et plusieurs objets sont repris de page en page, créant un joli thème très poétique.

Finalement, c’est un vrai plaisir de découvrir ce duos de frères illustrateurs canadiens. Une chose vraiment remarquable dans ce livre est la quantité d’informations que les images fournissent au lecteur et à la lectrice. Chaque image nous renseigne un peu plus sur les différents personnages, présents et absents, et permet de compléter l’information que le texte fourni. On assiste a un équilibre très plaisant entre le texte et les images.

Pour finir, ce livre est tout simplement magnifique. Les illustrations sont magiques et remplie de poésie. Elles seules sauront charmer tous les lecteurs. Le livre en lui-même étant également un très bel objet, il tient bien sa place dans toutes les bibliothèques. Si l’occasion se présente, retournez chercher ce livre, vous ne serez pas déçus!

Entre ciel et mer par les Frères Fan, Éditions Scholastic

Ocean Meets Sky, by the Fan Brothers Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers


 

Book review: Ocean Meets Sky by the Fan Brothers

This week, I share another book by Canadian writers and illustrators: Ocean meets Sky by the Fan Brothers. Some time ago, I had spotted this book in a small bookstore. I thought to myself, “this book is really beautiful… if it’s still there next time, I’ll take it! ” No big surprise, I went back on purpose to get it… and I’m not disappointed!

This book follows Finn as he goes on an imaginary boat trip in search of the place between the sky and the sea that his grandfather told him about. Subtly echoing Chinese tales, this story is sweet and imaginative. The text being quite minimal, one is quickly absorbed in the beautiful illustrations filled with fantastic and amusing details.

This album is very gentle. The story is simple, but allows for important themes such as grief, remembrance, and legacy to be addressed with children. Once again, the illustrations in this book are eye-catching in their richness. Like other books I have shared before, the illustrations were done in graphite and coloured on the computer. This technique creates a soft, matted feel here, which is very fitting for Finn’s journey. The images are also very skilfully composed and many objects are repeated from page to page, creating a lovely and very poetic theme.

Finally, it is a real pleasure to discover this duet of Canadian illustrators. One thing that is truly remarkable about this book is the amount of information that the images provide to the reader. Each image tells us a little more about the different characters, present and absent, and allows us to complete the information that the text provides. There is a very pleasant balance between the text and the images.

Finally, this book is simply beautiful. The illustrations are magical and full of poetry. They alone will charm all readers. The book itself is also a beautiful object, and it fits well in any library. If the opportunity comes up, go out and get this book, you won’t be disappointed!

Ocean Meets Sky, by the Fan Brothers Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers

Weekly News 11-11-2020

weekly news

(This is a news letter I sent out. If you’d like to receive fresh news every week, sign up here! The full newsletter contains surprises and is delivered once a week to your mailbox.)

Atelier News

I hope you are all doing well!

This week, I expended my office to have more space for a packing station! Orders are starting to come in (I’m so happy and grateful!), and I just couldn’t pack on my painting table anymore. So I did a bit of creative home design and used my teaching filing cabinet and an old door to create this beautifully functional space. I even found a space for some of my favourite artwork by Illulina and Heikala. I’m so pleased to have more space to pack your orders and also to paint and create.

New at the boutique

More Christmas products have made their way to the store!

I really struggled with this poinsettia painting, but in the end, I think it looks good! It’s available as a thank you card set and as a sticker sheet.

I had so much fun painting this little pinecone! Pinecones have always been really intimidating to draw to me, so I’m happy to have faced my fears and made this cute little thank you card!


THERE ARE A FEW COPIES OF MY BOOK LEFT IN STORE!

Inspiration

This week, I’m sharing a book in Russian! Trust me you’ll enjoy it even if you don’t read Russian!

Head over to the blog for a full review!

Youtube

I was so excited to share the Theremin last week, that I forgot about my own video… great job brain!
Here is a little vlog for October!

Small treat

Who else feels like this when it’s 20C in Quebec in November?

Ecoanxiety? Nooooooooo….

(If you enjoyed reading this, consider signing up to my newsletter. Each week, I send fresh news and surprise! Sign up here!)

Book review: L’oiseau de Colette par Isabelle Arsenault

Book Reviews

(In English over here!)

Cette semaine je vous partage un second livre par Isabelle Arsenault. Je vous avais déjà écrit sur Jane, le renard et moi que j’adore tout simplement. Cette fois-ci, je vous propose un livre pour un publique plus jeune: L’oiseau de Colette.

Pour commencer, ce livre fait partie d’une série de petits livres qui se passent tous dans le même quartier. Et ce qui est sympa, c’est que j’ai habité et travaillé dans ce quartier de Montréal. Il est amusant de voir une histoire se dérouler dans une ruelle que j’ai parcouru. Chaque livre de la série s’articule autour d’un enfant et de ses amis et voisins. Dans celui qui nous intéresse, on rencontre Colette qui vient d’aménager dans le quartier et qui part dans une course un peu folle de voisin de ruelle en voisin de ruelle à la recherche de sa perruche perdue.

Ce qui est agréable avec cette histoire ce que de page en page, on rencontre un par un les enfants de la ruelle qui se mettent tous à la recherche de l’oiseau de Colette. En fait, en lisant ce livre, j’avais un peu l’impression d’être dans une chanson à répondre. Au fur et à mesure que l’histoire se déroule, on découvre les talents d’oratrice de Colette et la personnalité de ses nouveaux amis. Pleine d’imagination et d’un désir d’aventure, Colette est vraiment attachante et on a l’impression de nous aussi faire partie de cette bande d’enfants presque sauvages lâchés dans leur ruelle.

Mais vous vous en doutez sans doute, ce n’est pas l’histoire qui m’a attirée vers ce livre, mais bien les illustrations. Le style d’Isabelle Arsenault est encore une fois bien reconnaissable et si agréable! Tout comme dans Jane, les illustrations sont majoritairement en noir et blanc avec une touche de couleur: ici surtout du jaune. L’effet crayon de papier créé également une atmosphère décontractée. Chacun des enfants de l’histoire est unique et leur personnalité se reflète dans chacun de leur jardin.

Cependant ce qui est vraiment génial avec les livres d’Isabelle Arsenault, c’est qu’on oublie qu’on est en train de lire un livre pour être entièrement absorbés dans son univers. La richesse des détails, les personnages attachants et comiques, l’histoire loufoque contribuent tous de façon harmonieuse à cet effet.

Finalement, ce livre est parfait pour tous les enfants qui pourront s’amuser à s’imaginer dans la bande de Colette, mais aussi pour tous ceux qui ont besoin d’une après-midi tranquille à chercher un drôle d’oiseau en compagnie de nouveaux amis. J’aime beaucoup le concept de ces livres: chaque livre est d’une couleur différente ce qui les rends collectionables!

L’oiseau de Colette par Isabelle Arsenault, La Pastèque

Colette’s Lost Pet, Penguin Random House


 

Book review: Colette’s Lost Pet by Isabelle Arsenault

This week I share with you a second book by Isabelle Arsenault. I had already written to you about Jane, the fox and me which I simply adore. This time, I bring you a book for a younger audience: L’oiseau de Colette.

To begin with, this book is part of a series of small books all set in the same neighborhood. And the cool thing is that I used to live and work in that neighborhood in Montreal. It’s fun to see a story set in an alley I’ve walked down. Each book in the series revolves around a child and their friends and neighbors. In the one we are interested in, we meet Colette who has just moved into the neighborhood and who goes on a bit of a wild goose chase from alley to alley in search of her lost parakeet.

What’s nice about this story is that from page to page, we meet the children in the alley, who all end up looking for Colette’s bird. In fact, while reading this book, I felt a bit like I was in a song. As the story unfolds, we learn about Colette’s storytelling skills and the personalities of her new friends. Full of imagination and a desire for adventure, Colette is really endearing and we feel like we too are part of this band of (almost) wild children let loose in their alley.

But as you can probably imagine, it’s not the story that drew me to this book, but the illustrations. Isabelle Arsenault’s style is once again very recognizable and so pleasant! As in Jane, the illustrations are mostly in black and white with a touch of color: here mostly yellow. The pencil effect also creates a relaxed atmosphere. Each of the children in the story is unique and their personality is reflected in each of their gardens.

But what’s really great about Isabelle Arsenault’s books is that you forget you’re reading a book and become completely absorbed in her world. The richness of the details, the endearing and comical characters, and the goofy story all contribute harmoniously to this effect.

Finally, this book is perfect for all children who will have fun imagining themselves in Colette’s gang, but also for all those who need a quiet afternoon to look for a funny bird with new friends. I love the concept of these books: each book is a different color which makes them collectible!

L’oiseau de Colette par Isabelle Arsenault, La Pastèque

Colette’s Lost Pet, Penguin Random House

Weekly News 11-04-2020

weekly news

(This is a news letter I sent out. If you’d like to receive fresh news every week, sign up here! The full newsletter contains surprises and is delivered once a week to your mailbox.)

Atelier News

I hope you are all doing well!

As I’m writing this letter, we had our first snowfall! It’s magical to have snow already. It blankets everything, and it’s beautiful.

In the atelier, things have been both peaceful and busy. Christmas orders are starting to roll in which is exciting and encouraging. I’m also working on some last minute Christmas products to add to the shop.


I spend most mornings painting and practising my watercolour skills. It’s very nice to have this learning space where I can experiment and learn.

Finally, I wanted to share a picture of my Halloween apple pie! It was delicious!

New at the boutique

A new sticker sheet is available for the witches among you! Discover the magic of runes with these cute stickers.

Big news!
THERE ARE A FEW COPIES OF MY BOOK IN STORE!

I received them at the beginning of the week, and I’m so happy that they are now available! Each one of these comes with a personal note and a serial number for this very limited first printing. I hope you will enjoy them!

Oh and don’t forget that it’s time to order your Christmas cards!

Inspiration

This week, I bring you another magical book : Comment la Princesse Elvire créa son propre royaume, by Didier Lévy and illustrated by Charlotte Gastaut. As the book is only availble in French at the moment, my review is in French. I still hope you will go check out the beautiful illustrations.

Head over to the blog for a full review!

On the blog

A special post on my reasons for breaking up with Instagram and my reflection on social media.

Small treat

Geeks and physics lovers rejoice, this week I’m sharing this incredible instrument: the Theremin!

(If you enjoyed reading this, consider signing up to my newsletter. Each week, I send fresh news and surprise! Sign up here!)